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Grind fish with lots of bones in a blender?

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Grind fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of jo » 06.09.2016, 19:32

Here in the “Food, Drink & Recipes” section, salmon and trout seem to be clearly dominant However, there are many other types of fish, including those that, despite their good meat, rarely end up on the plate. Most of you probably know what fish I'm talking about. I especially like bream or chub when it comes to meat ... if it weren't for those nasty bones.

Because of the bones, only very few of these fish are used as food fish. It's a shame, especially since you sometimes have a larger specimen on your fly rod. Sometimes I am optimistic and take the fish with me, bream in particular has great meat. But the disillusionment usually comes quickly, the devices are really not without.

Often people say yes, in such a case they prefer to make fish dumplings. As soon as I ask more closely, they say they would just put the meat in the blender. It shreds everything so that the bones are no longer a problem. However, it now seems to me as if this is being put together a lot. The other day I caught some larger chub and decided to chop them up in the blender. The aim was to make “Fiskbullar”, but it didn't really work out.

The problem is our mixer. Somehow he had problems chopping the meat and the bones. Suddenly the blender switched itself off, I guess it was overheating. Luckily I didn't damage it, today it's mixing again. But the meat mass was of course not ideal at the time, it was not completely chopped up. Some larger bones were still in between.

When I told the story to my cousin, he referred to his Vitamix. This is not just a blender, it's a high performance blender. Admittedly, I had never heard of these kitchen appliances before, but the Vitamix seems to be the king of the mixers. There is a powerful motor in the huge base and the blades are huge too. We went out and were able to catch some chub that ended up in the mixer that evening.

The result is clear, the high-performance mixer is in a different league. He chopped everything up, the fish dumplings were excellent. That's why I would love to buy such a high-performance mixer. But watch out, its price is tough. With an incredible 700 euros! (https://www.gruenesmoothies.org/shop/vitamix-pro-300/) it is probably a kind of kitchen appliance for the luxury kitchen. To be honest, that's a little too much money for me. For that I would rather buy a new rod

Now my question: Are there people here who also do Fiskbullar - if so, how do you do it? Do you chop the meat in the blender or use another kitchen appliance. Can your blender withstand this and what is the result?

Are there any alternatives? I remember my grandma owned a meat grinder. It was a really massive part, probably made of cast iron on the outside. But unfortunately it probably didn't survive the cleaning out of the household, otherwise I would have liked to try it out.

Best wishes
Yo
jo
 
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of orkdaling » 06.09.2016, 20:53

Hello Jo,
nice that you take up such a topic.
Yes, dear Græten, many also have schen. If you cut into fish like a bratwurst, you will no longer notice it.
But the problem is with your mixer problem or exactly that. The mixer does not chop but rather creates a mass. These are called fish pudding here and the fish balls end up in the hot water like a white sausage.
So the mass is too fine for fish buns to fry over low heat. For example, if you get an old meat grinder, you don't have to chop it.
The mass should by no means be mushy, so rather as coarse as Hackepeter for normal meatballs.
I'm already looking forward to the ice fishing season, which here on the weekends almost turns into a festival. With kids and cones, grill, campfire, Gløgg (something like mulled wine) on the ice. Usually you only catch smaller char of 20-25cm. But they like perch, so you fill a bucket full of water.
These small ones naturally have a lot of grass and are therefore processed into Fiskeboller (Swedish bullar).
Yes, the Swedes seem to like to eat that, at least they open up here during this time and usually stay a whole week.
Oh yes to the speed (mixer) again. If the speed is too high, the mass may become warm and the protein coagulates, but this should only be done in the pan to support the binding.
If you have the time, I would even advise you to just cut fillets and chop them like tartare, these will be the best!
Greetings to Hendrik
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of Olaf Kurth » 06.09.2016, 22:14

I agree directly with Hendrik's remarks, dear Jo

I also use the good old cast iron meat grinder that you already knew from your grandmother for the Fischpflanzerl. I have different attachments, so I can choose how fine or coarse I want the fish meat mass. I don't want to try this at all with my hand blender because the motor is too weak.

You can find these good, manual meat grinders at flea markets. One or the other hardware store or a household goods store will certainly be able to help. 700 euros for the Vital-Super-Mixer is a lot of money, but I prefer to buy a nice roll with me .....

Best regards,

Olaf
And God said to the stones in the river: "Do you want to become members of the UNFARIOUS?" And the stones replied, "No sir, we are not tough enough for that."
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of jo » 07.09.2016, 07:12

Hendrik, thank you very much for your comments!

I didn't realize that fish dumplings should have a rather coarse mixture. What the high-performance mixer delivered was actually more like a mush. He chopped the fish very finely. It wasn't much different with my cheap stand mixer. The indication of the warming is also helpful. Although it ultimately failed, the mass in my blender was warmed up. Here I have to attest to the Vitamix that I did not notice any noticeable warming. So protein should not have escaped from the meat.

I was probably not that wrong with my assessment of the meat grinder Let's see if I can find such a cheap kitchen appliance somewhere. Preferably an old, massive one that still has to be cranked.
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of Kurt Mack » 07.09.2016, 07:27

Hello!

The meat grinder has another advantage: Before use, a lot of bones collect, which can be quickly removed from time to time. So you usually only find a few very short bits of bone in the finished dish.

Bye, Kurt

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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of Royal Coachman » 07.09.2016, 09:46

Hello!
Since when did grayling have more bones than trout?

tight lines
RC
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of Olaf Kurth » 07.09.2016, 09:55

Kurt Mack wrote:Hello!

The meat grinder has another advantage: Before use, a lot of bones collect, which can be quickly removed from time to time. So you usually only find a few very short bits of bone in the finished dish.

Bye, Kurt


Absolutely right, dear Kurt.

jo wrote:Because of the bones, only very few of these fish are used as food fish. It's actually a shame, especially since every now and then you have a larger specimen on your fly rod. Sometimes I am optimistic and take the fish with me, bream in particular has great meat. But the disillusionment usually comes quickly, the devices are really not without it.


Try something other than fish cakes, e.g. the side pieces of bream, chub or roach are ideal as fried "patties" pickled in onion-vinegar stock. You can find one of the best information pages about the recovery of so-called "white fish" here: http://www.iertel-unterfranken.de/fisch ...schen.html

Best regards,

Olaf
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of Sigi » 07.09.2016, 12:52

Hey Jo,

I can wholeheartedly agree with the matter of the meat grinder. Back then in Karelia, my son caught perch, rudd etc. without end.
I just didn't want to eat the fish fried. So: bought a travel wolf made of sheet metal. It did its job very well, and it was even chunky
chopped onions. Spices and herbs at the same time went crazy. Went wonderful.
You can get a cast iron with different perforated disks for less than € 30 today.

By the way; Pickled sour, I personally think it's even better.

Greets
Sigi
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of orkdaling » 07.09.2016, 13:15

Hello RC,
he wrote about bream and dobel and I also replied that Æschen have a lot of grasses, no idea how you come across trout now.
The mostly larger trout or Mefo end up in my pan as fillet. The smaller schen or char are meatballs.
There are no chub, bream, tench, perch here, so I would have to drive to Glomma 150km further south.
Apart from trout and saibline, there are few waters that have a pike population, but only deeper lakes.
It is the same with the char, the relatively low-lying and not so nutrient-poor waters have many small fish. You can catch the really good char further up where there are only crooked birches. And they are definitely not made into meatballs
It was only important to me that the mass should not get warm. It's like making sausages where ice is added when cutting.
"Lean fish" such as saithe, pollack and cod are suitable for the fiskeboller. A specialty is saithe with cheese which is grated and added to the mass. Or fillets of the lean fish with parsley, dill, salt, pepper and 1-2 herrings, coarsely twisted and fried at not too high a heat.
Are you hungry?
Greetings to Hendrik
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of Royal Coachman » 07.09.2016, 14:45

Hello!

The grayling is a salmonid and has exactly the same arrangement of bones as salmon, Mefo, char and brown trout. .

It is just not true that grayling has many bones.

tight lines
RC
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of orkdaling » 07.09.2016, 15:51

Dear RC,
We are not talking about the skeleton of the Æsche but the many small intermediate / Stuetzgræten and there is probably a difference.
Every chef will confirm you, but you can also google it.
Greetings to Hendrik
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of Royal Coachman » 07.09.2016, 18:06

Hello !
Every salmonid has these supporting bones, including the brown trout.
If you take care when carving a fried fish, they will stay intact.

You don't need to google it, that's a fact!
tight lines
RC
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of orkdaling » 07.09.2016, 20:23

Well, everyone who has ever eaten salmon and Æsche can make up their own mind.
The fact is that for this very reason Æsche as a food fish is not on the menu of many people. You can't even buy them here because nobody eats them. I always bring me smoked from Sweden and they come to us to catch char.
It wasn't about frying fish and carefully removing the grass, but about mixers and fish stalls.
I also know that things don't look good for the girl in Germany, fortunately not here. Everyone knows such rivers as Glomma or Trysil.
If you are along the norw-swed. The border to the north fæhrts, so above north Trøndelag or Jæmtland you will find tons of lakes and streams where there are Æschen. In one of the last issues of Jakt & Fiske there was a travelogue, I would have to look for it, the author wrote: "If you want to leave the Æschenhølle you have to leave the forest behind you". That can be compared with the small masses of char in my region, you have to go up high. These small schen and char are processed into Fiskeboller for the reasons mentioned (not only by me) and lo and behold, all my visitors stuff their stomachs full. Just like with the Fiskebollers that I make from sea fish. No one wants to work, butchering, filleting, freaking out, roasting, but they all want to eat.
@Jo, now you know how it works, have fun.
Greetings to Hendrik
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of Royal Coachman » 07.09.2016, 21:13

Hello friends from the north!

I know that grayling is not very popular with you.
But your claim that grayling has many bones is simply wrong.
Biologically, grayling has no more bones than any other salmonid.

A grayling roasted whole and traditionally opened from the sidelines when eating doesn't have bones.
The bones in the back are stuck to the main bone, as with all salmonids.
Also prepared in foil in a bed of vegetables, there are no bones.
Of course, if you open the grayling (as well as the trout) from the back, which unfortunately is done in the finest houses, these fine bones break off in the back.
I often horrify when I watch the serving staff while they are carving how they "maltreat" the fish.

tight lines
RC

PS: I leave every other salmonid standing for a 50th grayling in the vegetable bed!
Always on the side of the fish!
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Re: Grinding fish with lots of bones in a blender?

of orkdaling » 07.09.2016, 22:47

Even if I have to repeat myself, it's not about the skeleton but the many small muscles.
And the Æschen eat or the chefs (not only in the north and not only on Google) have a slightly different opinion.
Or why is it less popular with many fish eaters?
It was not about the art of cutting up a fried fish by some inept waiters, but about grasses and mixers.
For me, the 500g fish are not chased through the mixer, of course.
Greetings to Hendrik
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