Can women be Hasidim?

Why do women have to cover their hair with either a wig or a headscarf after the wedding?

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Jewish Museum Berlin
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All about the visit

opening hours

Open daily from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Closing days

7th-8th Sep 2021
Rosh Hashanah
16 Sep 2021
Yom Kippur
24 Dec 2021
Christmas eve

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Question of the month about the exhibition "The Whole Truth"

Orthodox women no longer show their hair in public after the wedding. With a headscarf or a wig, called parting in Yiddish, they signal to those around them that they are married and that they follow the traditional notions of propriety.

The first meeting between Rebekah and Isaac provides the biblical origin: (Genesis 24, 64f) As a custom, covering one's hair became established in the 15th century and has been followed by Orthodox Judaism ever since.

In the strict Hasidic communities that emerged in Eastern Europe in the 18th century, it was even common for women to cut off all their hair at wedding and then to wear the tichel, a headscarf. Nevertheless, there were always gradual differences between the various orthodox currents in the interpretation of whether all hair remains veiled after the wedding or how much of her hair a woman shows. Today Orthodox women cover their hair with parting, a scarf, beret (a beret) or a hairnet.

Regardless of which variant a married woman chooses, she can choose from a wide range of fashionable options. Instructions for tying attractive tables and examples of how attractive a parting can be can be found on the Internet.

Many women nowadays, however, generally refuse to completely cover their hair for reasons of propriety.

Recommended citation:

Miriam Goldmann (2014), Why do women have to cover their hair with either a wig or a headscarf after the wedding? Question of the month about the exhibition “The Whole Truth”.
URL: www.jmberlin.de/node/6255

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Question of the month: everything you always wanted to know about Jews (7)

Everything you always wanted to know about Jews

Our exhibition The whole truth ... everything you always wanted to know about Jews built on 30 questions that were directed to the Jewish Museum Berlin or its staff. In the exhibition, our visitors themselves had the opportunity to leave questions or comments on post-its. We answer some of these questions here on our website.

How does the kippah hold on the head?

Michal Friedlander, curator for Judaica and applied arts, answers this question.

Why do women have to cover their hair with either a wig or a headscarf after the wedding?

Miriam Goldmann, curator of the exhibition, answers this question The whole truth

Why do some Jews bow down while praying?

Miriam Goldmann, curator of the exhibition, answers this question The whole truth

Do Jews have their own language?

Martina Lüdicke, curator of the exhibition, answers this question The whole truth

What role do gender issues play? What about female rabbis?

Anina Falasca, curator of the exhibition, answers this question The whole truth

Are there gay Jews?

Anina Falasca, Miriam Goldmann, Martina Lüdicke, curators of the exhibition, answer this question The whole truth

Was Goethe also a Jew?

Bernhard Jensen from our library answers this question.

The children's world of the Jewish Museum Berlin

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