What is the name of a dress without sleeves

Dress shapes

What types of clothes are there?

The market offers countless shapes and styles of clothes, but what shapes of clothes are there? A range of different shapes, colors, lengths and the numerous names often confuse more than they help. In the following overview you will learn how to avoid this confusion. The most common forms of dress with a detailed description:

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A-line dress

The A-line dress was originally designed by Christian Dior in 1955 and stands for all dresses that are structured like the letter A. Narrow shoulders and a cut that falls out towards the hem are the hallmarks of this dress. Advantage: The problem areas around the waist, hips and thighs are elegantly concealed.

A-line dress by Bmischka
A-line dress by Bmischka
A-line dress by Bmischka
A-line dress by Luisa Beccaria
A-line dress by Luisa Beccaria
A-line dress by Valentino Garavani
A-line dress from Versace

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Evening dress

An evening dress is one of the finest items of clothing in the area of ​​evening wear. It is worn on special and solemn evening occasions such as for the opera, the theater, at balls or at weddings. The elegant dress differs from normal clothing in terms of the fabric, cut and decorations. However, there is no precise specification of what the timeless classic should look like. You can find patterns for evening dresses as a download in our e-dossier evening dresses.

Evening dress by Dennis Basso
Evening dress by Valentino Garavani

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Babydoll dress

The babydoll dress is characterized by the combination of feminine and childlike design elements. This dress, made famous in 1956 by the film "Baby Doll", is a wide-cut mini dress with short sleeves or straps. Advantage: Creates a younger look with a childlike touch.

Babydoll dress from Armani
Babydoll dress from Blugirl
Babydoll dress from Blumarine
Babydoll dress from Diesel
Babydoll dress from Diesel
Babydoll dress by Lena Hoschek
Babydoll dress by Lena Hoschek

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wedding dress

The wedding dress (also wedding dress) is worn by the bride to her wedding. In Europe, the classic dress is long, high-necked and white. It varies in the exact color (white, cream, ivory) and cut (for example as an A-line, Empire, Princess). It is not uncommon for the dress to be further decorated with pearls, rhinestones or elegant embroidery. Patterns for 4 wedding dresses can be found in our wedding dress e-dossier as a download.

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Cocktail dress

The cocktail dress lies between an elaborate evening dress and a simple day dress, so this dress is festive but not as pompous as a long evening dress. It reaches up to the calves and often has a subtle cleavage. The cocktail dress is characterized by a figure-hugging, feminine cut and usually extends to the knees. Advantage: Festive, feminine and a real classic. A pattern for a cocktail dress can be downloaded here.

Cocktail dress by Bmischka
Cocktail dress by Emanuel Ungaro
Cocktail dress by Emanuel Ungaro
Cocktail dress by Emanuel Ungaro

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The little black one

The little black dress (also "LBD" for little black dress) is a classic in women's fashion. Due to the classic cut, you are well dressed in this dress for every occasion - whether for a business meeting, dinner or party. The term “the little black dress” was founded in 1926 by the illustration of a black sheath dress by Chanel in the American Vogue. The black shift dress is a real combination all-rounder. Advantage: Embodies timeless elegance, is easy to combine and is considered a classic.

The little black dress from Anteprima
The little black dress from Anteprima
The little black dress from Bmischka
The little black dress from Dior
The little black dress from Dolce
The little black dress by Guido Maria Kretschmer
The little black dress by Guido Maria Kretschmer
Jil Sander's little black dress
The little black dress from Roland
The little black dress from Versace
The little black dress from Versace

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Empire dress

The empire dress dates from the time of the French Empire under Napoleon. It is characterized by a raised waist and a cross seam below the chest, which emphasizes the latter. From the waist height, the fabric falls in an A-shape to the hem and flatters the figure. Advantage: By emphasizing the chest and concealing problem areas such as the stomach and thighs, this dress is considered a figure flatterer.

Empire dress from Balenciaga
Empire dress by Diane von Fürstenberg
Empire dress by Laura Biagiotti
Empire dress by Luisa Beccaria
Empire dress by Scognamiglio
Empire dress from Empire Vivetta

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Shift dress

The body-hugging shift dress is cut without a waist separation and is considered a timeless piece of clothing, which can often be found in the upscale women's wardrobe. The dress usually appears with a collarless, horizontal neckline - but there are also variants with a V- or U-neckline or with a small stand-up collar. In addition, a shift dress is worn sleeveless or with short sleeves. The hem usually reaches the knee in length. Advantage: a timeless, elegant companion. A pattern for a shift dress can be downloaded here.

Shift dress by Antonio Marras
Shift dress by Ermanno Scervino
Shift dress by Guy Laroche
Shift dress by Joseph Altuzarra
Shift dress by Laura Biagiotti
Shift dress by Roland Mouret

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Shirt dress

The shirt dress (also known as a sack dress) designed by Coco Chanel in 1916 mixes elements of women’s and men’s fashion. The dress is developed from a shirt blouse, a blouse in a men's cut with a collar, button placket, cuffs and a skirt part. The waist is usually emphasized feminine with the help of a belt. This dress is beautifully uncomplicated and is usually worn as a sporty day dress. Shirt dresses come in a wide variety of variants, so there is really something for every taste. Advantage: Looks sporty, casual and is suitable for almost every type of woman. A pattern for a shirt dress can be downloaded here in Rundschau 09/2017.

Shirt dress by Blumarine
Shirt dress by Bottega
Shirt dress from Bottega
Shirt dress by Bottega
Shirt dress by Lena Hoschek
Shirt dress by Lena Hoschek
Shirt dress by Lena Hoschek
Shirt dress from Loewe
Shirt dress by Marccain
Shirt dress by Moschino
Shirt dress from Talbot
Shirt dress by Valentino Garavani

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Halter dress

The halterneck dress is characterized by its shoulder and backless area. As the name suggests, the dress is tied at the neck. Advantage: Looks very elegant. You can find a pattern for your next halter top here.

Neckholder dress by Biagiotti
Neckholder dress by Bottega
Halter dress by Diane von Fürstenberg
Halter dress by Diane von Fürstenberg
Neckholder dress by Ermanno Scervino
Neckholder dress by Lena Hoschek
Neckholder dress by Lena Hoschek
Halter dress by Luisa Beccaria

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Princess dress

The princess dress was created by Charles Frederick Worth in 1864. The body-hugging dress nestles against the body thanks to its vertical dividing seams (princess seams = the waist dart is laid in a vertical dividing seam that runs from the shoulder seam, over the chest point to the hem) without emphasizing the waist. Advantage: an elegant and timeless dress.

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Shift dress

The shift dress is often confused with the shift dress. Originally the shift dress is short, straight or trapezoidal and has no cut or seams at the waist. In contrast to the shift dress, the cut of the shift dress is a little wider. Advantage: A comfortable and practical dress.

Shift dress by Anteprima
Shift dress by Arthur Arbesser
Shift dress by Guido Maria Kretschmer
Shift dress by Salvatore Ferragamo

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Wrap dress

The wrap dress is closed in the front by a superimposed over and under step with ribbons. As usual with women's clothing, the right side is placed over the left side. The wrapping creates a V-neckline and a strongly figure-hugging silhouette. Diane von Fürstenberg is considered to be the inventor of the wrap dress, who designed the first wrap dress in 1972. Advantage: Considered one of the most feminine dresses.

Wrap dress by Diane von Fürstenberg
Wrap dress by Trussardi
Wrap dress by Lena Hoschek
Wrap dress by Ermannt Scervino
Wrap dress by Anna Dello Russo

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Which dress style suits me?

In our figure guide you can find out which dress goes with which body shape, what needs to be considered and which combination options are available. With the help of the right choice of clothing, problem areas can be easily concealed and advantages emphasized. Here are some tips on how to find out what type of figure you are:

  1. Find your dominant body features.
  2. Compare this to all types.
  3. Pick the guy who is most like you.

A distinction is made between the following 5 figure types:

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The A-type

The A-type (also pear type) symbolizes the feminine figure. Petite shoulders and broad hips are the easiest distinguishing features. To compensate for the wider lower body, focus on your upper body. Further characteristics for the A-type are:

  • dainty shoulders
  • narrow torso
  • long, graceful arms
  • small breasts
  • flat belly
  • wide hips
  • strong thighs
  • slim calves

That suits you: Make sure you balance it proportionally with patterns and / or asymmetrical cutouts in the upper body area and accentuated shoulders. Better not: shift dresses and tight-fitting dresses in the hip area.

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The V type

The V-type looks like an inverted triangle with broad shoulders and narrow hips. Ideally, the perfect dress will make your shoulders appear narrower. You can recognize the V-type by the following features:

  • pronounced shoulders
  • broad, strong back
  • The waist circumference is larger than the chest size
  • little waist
  • slender hips
  • small butt
  • slim legs

That suits you: Halter dresses, V-necks and one-shoulder dresses stretch the upper body. Better not: Empire dresses, carmen necklines (deep, shoulder-free necklines), dresses with spaghetti straps.

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The O type

The oval shape of the O-type is associated with a rounded body.
Your dress distracts from the abdominal region and puts your slim legs and your great cleavage in the foreground. These and other features:

  • Legs and arms appear narrow
  • voluptuous breasts
  • beautiful cleavage
  • little waist
  • round belly
  • full hips
  • flat bottom
  • slim legs

That suits you: wrap dress, shirt dress, empire dress with deep necklines and muted colors. Better not: shift dress.

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The H type

The rectangular shape of the H-type makes the shoulders, hips and waist appear the same in width. With your choice of clothes you can accentuate your curves more. The H-type and its features:

  • Shoulders, waist and hips are hardly rounded
  • narrow back
  • small breast
  • little waist
  • slender hips
  • small butt
  • long legs
  • athletic

This suits you: A-line dresses, wrap dresses, empire dress, shirt dress. Better not: oversized dresses.

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The X type

The X-type (also hourglass) is the classic and most feminine figure among the body types. The distinguishing feature is the "ideal size" 90-60-90 with pronounced chest and hip areas as well as the following features:

  • Shoulders and hips about the same width
  • narrow, high waist
  • medium to large breast
  • flat belly
  • full hips
  • full buttocks
  • strong thighs

That suits you: shift dresses, wrap dresses, V-necks. Better not: voluminous cuts, oversized models, mini dresses.

Are you looking for more information, inspiration or the latest trends? Then take a look at our “Dresses” pinboard on Pinterest. You can find numerous patterns for beginners and those with experience in sewing in the book Patterns for Dresses and Blouses.

First published in 2019, last updated on May 22, 2019.

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